Elderly Parent Is At Home

How To Go Away Without Worry When Your Elderly Parent Is At Home

We all look forward to our annual holiday, a chance to kickback from the routine and the stresses of everyday life for a week or two. In fact, some of us dream all year of escaping the daily grind for a week or so, whether it’s winter or summer sunshine we seek, or something more cultural. But, when you have an elderly parent who relies on you, taking a break can seem impossible. However, there are ways in which you can have a break knowing your parent is being looked out for;

Elderly Parent Is At Home

Live in carer

Opting for a live in carer is something that many people benefit from. According to the No Place Like Home Report, three-quarters of older people don’t want to leave their own home. In practice, it can mean a lot of worry and reliance on relatives to provide the care that an older person may need.

It can also lead to loneliness and isolation but with a live in carer, staying in their own home is a more viable option. And for families, it certainly eases the worry of looking after an elderly parent. Many people feel guilty when they leave their parents too and again, this kind of option could be exactly what is needed.

Respite residential care

Another option is respite care. This is where an elderly person will live in a rest home for the time that their family are away. Get the right placement and it can feel like a holiday in itself. Along with good food and a change of scene, there will also be plenty of company and other activities to enjoy too.

Unfortunately, not everyone sees it that way. It can be a stressful time for people who simply want to stay at home. Residential placements can be hard to find too so its not an option for everyone.

Elderly Parent Is At Home

Rely on technology for contact and monitoring

There is a whole range of technology that can be used in the home of an elderly parent that helps to maintain contact whilst you are away. From cameras that you can access remotely to sensors on doors etc., technology that provides the feedback you need to make sure your parent is safe at home and you can even communicate with them through technology so they don’t miss you too much.

The downsides are many, however. Your parent may find cameras intrusive. And will you really relax when you have notifications on your phone every five minutes (or worse, when the notifications stop. Has something happened?).

There are also schemes that you could but into in which your elderly parent could access when they needed help. Likewise, you could pay an agency for carers to visit daily.

Is there a worry-free option?

In some ways, no matter what you do, you’ll always be thinking of your parent and whether they are safe. Why not find out more about The Live In Care Hub (www.liveincarehub.co.uk) and how a carer/companion living with your parent 24/7 can benefit everyone?